UWT Award Winners
Community Health Workers

Community Health Workers

Field day

CHWs are known by many names, including outreach workers, promotores(as) de salud, patient navigators, community health representatives, and community health advisors. Regardless of their title, CHWs are the neighbors and peers who help individuals in their communities change their behaviors around health for the better.

Recent Activity

Thursday, July 16 2015

Tuesday, April 21 2015

Thursday, January 29 2015

  • Master Home Environmentalist Program -- Free Home Health Assessments for residents living in the City of Seattle
    1:04pm

    AmericanLungMHE

    Do you care about your health, your family's health, and other peoples' health? Are you concerned about environmental health issues such as exposure to mold, dust, hazardous household chemicals, and other pollutants? Do you talk with friends, relatives, neighbors, and community members about health problems and solutions? Would you like to increase your knowledge about indoor air quality and improve your ability to communicate? If you answered yes to any or all of these questions, you'd probably be a great Master Home Environmentalist © (MHE) volunteer!

    To enroll in the volunteer training, prospective volunteers must complete an application and go through an interview selection process. Attending the 35 hour training and completing 35 hours of community service are the most important requirements to become an MHE volunteer -- you don't need to be an environmentalist or an expert in anything. We look for diverse individuals who are committed to actively participating in the training sessions and who will volunteer in their communities. We want people who will enjoy working together to improve their own and others' health.

    As a Master Home Environmentalist © you will recognize hazards such as lead, dust, household chemicals, mold, and other air pollutants; use low cost or no cost methods to reduce risks; teach others about health hazards in their home and how poor air quality can affect their health; and conduct free in-home environmental assessments.

    The topics covered in the MHE trainings include: moisture and biological contaminants, dust, lead, toxicology, cultural diversity, secondhand smoke, asthma, household chemicals, ventilation, landlord/tenant rights and responsiblities, and communication and behavior change.

    If you are interested in next Training, please fill out an MHE Volunteer Application and we will keep it on file. Apply here: http://www.lung.org/associations/...

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Wednesday, January 28 2015

Monday, December 15 2014

Thursday, October 2 2014

  • 11:40am
    Changes to Body
     
    Be familiar with the benefits of being involved in a CHW Professional Association
     
    Be familiar with the benefits of being involved in a CHW Professional Association
     
     
    -
    Click on the link to register and for more info :  http://www.orchwa.org/conf/ [3]
    +
    Click on the link to register and for more info: http://www.orchwa.org/conf/
     
     
     
    [1] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtIY7CQf-EU
     
    [1] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtIY7CQf-EU
     
    [2] https://www.google.com/maps/dir//Erb+Memorial+Union,+1228+University+St,+Eugene,+OR+97403/@44.044674,-123.073752,17z/data=!4m18!1m9!4m8!1m0!1m6!1m2!1s0x54c11fd155555555:0x64c0c00d5fb7fabf!2sErb+Memorial+Union,+1228+University+St,+Eugene,+OR+97403!2m2!1d-123.073752!2d44.044674!4m7!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x54c11fd155555555:0x64c0c00d5fb7fabf!2m2!1d-123.073752!2d44.044674
     
    [2] https://www.google.com/maps/dir//Erb+Memorial+Union,+1228+University+St,+Eugene,+OR+97403/@44.044674,-123.073752,17z/data=!4m18!1m9!4m8!1m0!1m6!1m2!1s0x54c11fd155555555:0x64c0c00d5fb7fabf!2sErb+Memorial+Union,+1228+University+St,+Eugene,+OR+97403!2m2!1d-123.073752!2d44.044674!4m7!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x54c11fd155555555:0x64c0c00d5fb7fabf!2m2!1d-123.073752!2d44.044674
    -
    [3] Learn new skills and deepen knowledge of important health topics Enhance awareness of Community Health Worker’s role in achieving Oregon’s Triple Aim Strengthen networks with other CHWs Develop concrete strategies to practice Self-Care Increase capacity to be involved in policy development for your own profession Increase capacity to navigate the CHW certification system. Be familiar with...
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  • 10:36am

    APPROPRIATION VS. APPRECIATION

    An Illustrated Style Guide

    When it comes to wearing or designing fashion based on other cultures, it’s hard to know if you’re being tacky, cool, or offensive. The dangers of cultural appropriation go beyond offending people,appropriation continues patterns of disempowering groups that are already marginalized. Looks shouldn’t be THAT important. Ideally, we can feel cute while empowering people with what we wear.

    “THAT’S RAD, BUT HOW CAN I TELL IF I’M APPROPRIATING?”

    Well, before you put on that bindi, kimono, “street wear” or adorn yourself with cornrows, a headdress or turban, here’s some easy questions to ask yourself:

    #1. What culture does this style reference, and what is my relation to that culture?

    The most important thing to keep in mind, is that you’re part of a global community, so whether you mean it or not, what you wear has meaning connected to that global context. If what you want to wear references a culture that is experiencing or has experienced injustice, violence, or a traumatic colonial past, appropriating the culture can offensively repeat patterns of unequal give and take- especially depending on how your own culture/past is related to that trauma.

    If the item in question finds its origins in a culture you’re not a part of, move onto question 2.

    #2. Why are you wearing it?

    Let’s be real, half the time the reason you’re wearing an item will reveal some of your own values to yourself.

    Cute! Getting in gear with your Desi bride at an Indian-style wedding.

    ...
    Read more
  • 10:36am

    APPROPRIATION VS. APPRECIATION

    An Illustrated Style Guide

    When it comes to wearing or designing fashion based on other cultures, it’s hard to know if you’re being tacky, cool, or offensive. The dangers of cultural appropriation go beyond offending people,appropriation continues patterns of disempowering groups that are already marginalized. Looks shouldn’t be THAT important. Ideally, we can feel cute while empowering people with what we wear.

    “THAT’S RAD, BUT HOW CAN I TELL IF I’M APPROPRIATING?”

    Well, before you put on that bindi, kimono, “street wear” or adorn yourself with cornrows, a headdress or turban, here’s some easy questions to ask yourself:

    #1. What culture does this style reference, and what is my relation to that culture?

    The most important thing to keep in mind, is that you’re part of a global community, so whether you mean it or not, what you wear has meaning connected to that global context. If what you want to wear references a culture that is experiencing or has experienced injustice, violence, or a traumatic colonial past, appropriating the culture can offensively repeat patterns of unequal give and take- especially depending on how your own culture/past is related to that trauma.

    If the item in question finds its origins in a culture you’re not a part of, move onto question 2.

    #2. Why are you wearing it?

    Let’s be real, half the time the reason you’re wearing an item will reveal some of your own values to yourself.

    Cute! Getting in gear with your Desi bride at an Indian-style wedding.

    ...
    Read more
  • 10:36am

    APPROPRIATION VS. APPRECIATION

    An Illustrated Style Guide

    When it comes to wearing or designing fashion based on other cultures, it’s hard to know if you’re being tacky, cool, or offensive. The dangers of cultural appropriation go beyond offending people,appropriation continues patterns of disempowering groups that are already marginalized. Looks shouldn’t be THAT important. Ideally, we can feel cute while empowering people with what we wear.

    “THAT’S RAD, BUT HOW CAN I TELL IF I’M APPROPRIATING?”

    Well, before you put on that bindi, kimono, “street wear” or adorn yourself with cornrows, a headdress or turban, here’s some easy questions to ask yourself:

    #1. What culture does this style reference, and what is my relation to that culture?

    The most important thing to keep in mind, is that you’re part of a global community, so whether you mean it or not, what you wear has meaning connected to that global context. If what you want to wear references a culture that is experiencing or has experienced injustice, violence, or a traumatic colonial past, appropriating the culture can offensively repeat patterns of unequal give and take- especially depending on how your own culture/past is related to that trauma.

    If the item in question finds its origins in a culture you’re not a part of, move onto question 2.

    #2. Why are you wearing it?

    Let’s be real, half the time the reason you’re wearing an item will reveal some of your own values to yourself.

    Cute! Getting in gear with your Desi bride at an Indian-style wedding.

    ...
    Read more
  • 10:22am

    Community health-changers!

    Take a look at this cool opportunity. Everyday Feminism is offering a self-paced course on turning self-love into a busy habit. In our line of work, self care and reflection is vital to maintaining health - not just of the communities, but of our own.

    This course offers modules of skills and tools to create empowering daily habits along with personalized coaching, group exercises, meditation guides, and lifetime access to resources for self love and teaching self love. 

    Who's game?

    Here is the link : 

    http://everydayfeminism.com/everyday-self-love/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=Courses-Page-to-Es 

    See below for more! 

    Everyday-Self-Love-Image
    FREE YOURSELF FROM TOXIC MESSAGES AND BUILD A DAILY PRACTICE OF SELF-LOVE

    In this self-paced online course with lifetime access, you’ll learn how to build a daily practice of:

    • Being resilient to toxic messages within yourself and from others
    • Honoring and communicating your needs and wants
    • Accepting your internal experiences with compassion, not judgment
    • Finding validation within yourself and prioritizing your own truth

    By taking daily actions that show yourself that you have inherent self-worth, you’ll develop greater self-confidence to just be your authentic self.

    SCHOLARSHIP FUND
    If you’re on limited income, we’ve set aside $1 out of every $4 into a Scholarship Fund. So if you think the course can make a difference in your life, cost doesn’t need to be a barrier!

    30-DAY MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE
    We want to make sure that this course is right for you. And if you find that it’s not, you can get a full refund anytime within the first 30 days of the course just by letting us know.

    THIS COURSE INCLUDES:

    ...

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Tuesday, September 30 2014

Friday, September 26 2014

Monday, September 8 2014

  • 12:04pm

    Hi Team & Friends of Healthy Gen!

    I just wanted to share some updates in regards to scholarship information for Healthy Gen’s upcoming event! We have set up a site for people who might be interested in coming to the conference to apply for scholarships to offset the registration fee – we really want as many Community Health Workers, Community Members & Community Leaders to attend as possible. Scholarships range from 25%-100% off of registration. Once filled out we will be getting back to people as soon as possible with notification of awards.

    I attached an overview of the upcoming conference. We have some great presenters & workshops lined up! Many of the workshops & speakers are focusing on powerful research in regards to Resilience, Family & Youth Engagement, Attachment & Brain’s Executive Functioning, Elevating Community Voice, & Community Resilience.

    Ron Sims, Michael Unger, Deborah Gray, Colleen Kraft, Margaret Hargreaves, Tina Rosenberg, Robert Anda, and Governor Jay Inslee are only some of the amazing speakers that will be in the room.

    If you know of other people or organizations that might be interested in attending please share far & wide the agenda & scholarship information. Agenda & link to registration is on our website as well.

    Here's a link to register:

    Coalescing for Change: Community Based Health Solutions September 17 & 18 at the Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center. Hotel rooms are limited, book now to reserve your space.

     If you have questions about the event, contact:

    Kate Groen | Administrative Services Coordinator

    Foundation for Healthy Generations

    (formerly Comprehensive Health Education Foundation – CHEF)

    419 3rd Ave West | Seattle, WA | 98119

    206.832.1897 | C 360.820.1669 | F 206.824.3072 | E kateg@healthygen.org  

     

    Read more
  • 9:58am

    http://www.upworthy.com/a-town-eliminated-the-worst-part-of-going-to-school-spoiler-alert-everyone-loves-it

    Did you walk to your grade school? Take a look and see what the absence of a school bus system meant for this community. What's the situation for your community, or your children? Do they have a safe route to school and back home? 

Friday, September 5 2014